Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

PHASE ONE IQ CONFERENCE • MILK STUDIO

March 20, 2012

From the moment I arrived at the Phase One IQ Conference last Tuesday at Milk Studio in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, I felt right at home. Hosted by Digital Transitions, the all-day conference left me more determined than ever to make an IQ back a permanent part of my gear. Check-in was a breeze, having registered online ahead of time so I headed straight to the Hands-on IQ session taking place in Studio A, which was outfitted with top of the line Broncolor packs, heads and light modifiers.

© Tony Powell. Linnea Hart. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Eye Detail. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Linnea Hart. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Phase One IQ system. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

I’d been waiting to try out this system for several years so when I held the Phase One 645DF for the first time it was as though I’d owned the camera from the start. The way it fits in the hands and the weight of the body and lens felt as if the system were a natural extension of my arms and eyes – exactly how I had hoped it would feel. The one thing I couldn’t anticipate, though, was the enormous difference in quality of the image produced by the 80-megapixel and my 21-megapixel Canon 5D Mark II. There is NOTHING like it and I’ll never look at image-making the same way again.

Photo by Daniel Sone. My first time shooting with the Phase One IQ 180! Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Phase One Capture Pilot demonstration. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Broncolor Tutorial with Andre. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Lena Vesel. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Linnea Hart. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It reminded me of the first frames I made with my very first medium format film camera – the twin lens reflex Mamiya C3 – in 1995. When those scanned transparencies came back from the photo shop I couldn’t believe the level of detail and the high dynamic range that the 6×6 format offered.

Mamiya C3 Twin Lens Reflex

I soon-after bought he Hasselblad 501 CM and in so doing, found my camera of choice…so I thought. The Phase One 645DF with the IQ back has changed it all and it’s a matter of when, not if, it’ll be my next system.

Hasselblad 501CM

With the advent of the digital age in the late 90’s and early 2000’s – more and more more pressure was placed on “film” photographers to jump on board the pixel bandwagon. Outfitting my medium format gear with the digital backs that were showing up on the market at the time proved too cost prohibitive to justify the expense, so I bought my first DSLR, instead – the Canon 20D. A succession of cameras followed…the 40D, the Canon G11, the 7D for a brief time, and ultimately (2) 5D Mark IIs…all the while, waiting for the day I could afford to return to the medium format – but this time at the digital level.

© Tony Powell. Digital Transitions rep Lance Schad and photographer Jaime DeMarco discuss the differences between DSLRs and the digital medium format. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Phase One IQ back on an Arca Swiss technical camera. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Models Lena Vesel and Linnea Hart. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Conference presenter/photographer Jaime DeMarco examining the accuracy of the IQ 180's focussing mask.

© Tony Powell. Digital Workstation. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

© Tony Powell. Lena Vesel. Milk Studio NYC. March 20, 2012

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

WASHINGTON LIFE MAGAZINE APRIL FASHION EDITORIAL

PHOTOGRAPHER Tony Powell

MODEL Natalie Hockey

DATE Sunday, March 20, 2011

LOCATION Tudor Place, Georgetown

CLOTHING STYLISTS Krystal Ugo & Kristin Lyle

HAIRSTYLIST Warren Beautiful

MAKEUP ARTIST Leah Bassett

LIGHTING ASSISTANTS: Andrew Paterini, Daniel Gill, and Maria Plutz

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

My team! Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

Credit: Maria Plutz/Tony Powell Images

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When the call came asking if I’d be interested in shooting a centerfold spread for the International Pole Dancing Magazine Pole2Pole, I jumped at the opportunity. Last week, I got to collaborate once again with my good friend, top-ranking pole dancer and Pole Pressure Studio owner, Jessalynn Medairy.

Photo © Tony Powell. Jessalynn Medairy. November 22, 2010

Photo © Tony Powell. Jessalynn Medairy. November 22, 2010

There’s an unspoken trust and mutual admiration that’s apparent each time we get together to shoot. The new main shooting space at Sly Horse Studio was the perfect location at which to shoot. The high ceilings and the ample array of in-house studio equipment easily handled the potential challenges of shooting a dancer on a 15-foot high pole.

Photo © Tony Powell. Jessalynn Medairy. November 22, 2010

Photo © Tony Powell. Jessalynn Medairy. November 22, 2010

© Tony Powell. April Rae Giangeruso. August 25, 2010

The time I got to spend photographing American Ballet Theatre ballerina April Rae Giangeruso was an afternoon I’ll never forget! Gracious, intuitive, and abundantly talented, are just a few adjectives to describe one of the newest members of ABT.

© Tony Powell. April Rae Giangeruso. August 25, 2010

© Tony Powell. April Rae Giangeruso. August 25, 2010

Images by Tony Powell • Words by Natalie Berk

© Tony Powell. Natalie Berk. May 17, 2010

I had the honor of being photographed by Tony Powell yesterday. Being my first artistic shoot, it was an enlightening experience. As a young girl on the threshold of a grown-up world, it’s sometimes difficult to shed anxieties and it’s scary giving yourself permission to just relax – but with my Mother at my side holding a big silver reflection board, and Tony cracking jokes, I slowly began to let go.

© Tony Powell. Natalie Berk. May 17, 2010

© Tony Powell. Natalie Berk. May 17, 2010

© Tony Powell. Natalie Berk. May 17, 2010

Working with Synetic Theater has taught me that each body holds its own individual story. Tony, as a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music, shares this frame of mind. It’s unbelievable to have an established artist like Tony collaborate with a young artist such as myself. And I am so incredibly lucky to have him to give breath to my artistic visions.

© Tony Powell. Natalie Berk. May 17, 2010

Today I watched some of my own stories come to life through the moments captured by Tony’s lens.

© Tony Powell. Between Time. March 28, 2010. Dancers: Devon Teuscher, Junio Teixeira, Se-Yong Kim, and Enton Hoxha

It finally happened! My 120th ballet, “Between Time” (no longer “In Between Time,” I dropped the “In”) was successfully given its World Premiere last night at Baltimore Ballet‘s 10th Anniversary Gala. Originally slated to have its first go February 6th, the Gala was postponed until March 28th – the result of last month’s snow storm of epic proportions that we all unwittingly endured.

© Tony Powell. Between Time. March 28, 2010. Dancers: Devon Teuscher, Junio Teixeira, Se-Yong Kim, and Enton Hoxha

To top it all off when it came time to reassemble the original members of my cast (8 dancers) I was informed that 2 of them weren’t able to get released from their contracts to perform on the new date, and another was struggling with ankle problems. Instead of throwing in the towel, I chose to remain optimistic and zeroed in on the middle movement of the ballet as a point of departure. It made sense to re-work this section – a pas de quatre or dance for four – and transform it into a work that could live on its own. I’d originally chopped off a minute and a half of the music, by much in-demand composer Max Richter, to balance the flow of the ballet but returned the score to its original length which provided an opportunity to add to the dimension of the pas de deux that opens that section. With each of the four dancers working in and around New York City – ABT, Met Opera Ballet, and New Jersey Ballet – I knew I had to go there  (twice last week) if I wanted to bring the piece back to life after the 7-week hiatus.

© Tony Powell. Between Time. March 28, 2010. Dancers: Devon Teuscher, Junio Teixeira

© Tony Powell. Between Time. March 28, 2010. Dancers: Devon Teuscher, Junio Teixeira

It was worth EVERY minute! Just after the curtain came down on me bowing with the dancers I left the stage only to be thrust into the arms of a female stagehand that was crying after having watched my piece. We bonded in that moment as we cried together. Who could ask for a greater compliment than that? I realized – maybe for the first time – that I’d been able to translate something very personal to me into something meaningful to others.

© Tony Powell. Between Time. March 28, 2010. Dancers: Devon Teuscher, Junio Teixeira, Se-Yong Kim

© Tony Powell. Impact Dance Company. March 20, 2010

My first experience – last Saturday – shooting at Sly Horse Studio in Rockville was a great success! I’m giving my first “Capturing Motion” Master Class there April 4th from 1-4pm with top DC dancer Delphina Parenti as the model for the live shooting portion of the workshop. My wife Kellie co-directs a dance company called IMPACT, with fellow dancer and choreographer Candra Preshong. Their need for new promo pix for an upcoming concert provided the perfect opportunity to try out new studio digs. What a relief not to have to lug around a trunk full of equipment for a change. Every piece of equipment I use on a regular basis (except my camera) was available, on-site, for the asking…strobes, soft boxes, reflectors of every stripe, grids, flags, V-cards, etc.

IMPACT Dance Company. Photo © Tony Powell. March 20, 2010

IMPACT Dance Company. Photo © Tony Powell. March 20, 2010

© Tony Powell. Impact Dance Company. March 20, 2010

The most convenient aspect of the studio’s setup is the complex overhead rail system! The way in which the strobe lighting system (White Lightning) is affixed to it is ingenious. Each mono-light can be moved up/down/sideways/diagonally to achieve nearly any angle required. Each of the 4 strobes has been wired to lead directly into one commander which allows for light adjustment in one centrally located place. No longer do I have to run back and forth to each lamp adjusting intensities of light. This ability to quickly adjust light levels and light positioning increased my workflow and gave me the freedom to experiment with a wide range of lighting setups.

© Tony Powell. Impact Dance Company. March 20, 2010